International Journal of Hematology

DOI: 10.1007/s12185-019-02647-5 Pages: 673-683

Impact of treatment-related weight changes from diagnosis to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation on clinical outcome of acute myeloid leukemia

1. Yokohama City University, Department of Stem Cell and Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine

2. Yokohama City University Medical Center, Department of Hematology

3. Yokohama City University, Department of Hematology and Clinical Immunology, School of Medicine

4. Kanagawa Cancer Center, Department of Hematology

5. Yamato Municipal Hospital, Department of Hematology/Oncology

6. Shizuoka Red Cross Hospital, Department of Hematology

7. Fujisawa City Hospital, Department of Hematology

8. Saiseikai Yokohama Nanbu Hospital, Department of Hematology

9. Yokohama City University Hospital, Clinical Laboratory Department

Correspondence to:
Taiki Ando
Tel: +81-45-261-5656
Email: taimo029@yahoo.co.jp

Close

Abstract

We hypothesized that treatment-related weight loss is associated with worse outcomes following HSCT. Overall, 184 patients with AML who underwent induction therapy were classified according to d-BMI (BMI at transplant minus BMI at diagnosis) (kg/m2) as < −2, − 2 to + 2, and > + 2. At 1 year, OS was 67.9% (95% CI, 60.7–74.2), DFS was 64.1% (95% CI, 56.7–70.6), and GRFS was 40.2% (95% CI, 33.1–47.2). For d-BMI groups < − 2, − 2 to + 2, and > + 2, GRFS at 1 year was 16.1% (95% CI, 5.1–31.4), 45.4% (95% CI, 36.4–53.7), and 41.7% (95% CI, 22.2–60.1), respectively (P = 0.0067). Multivariate analysis showed that both worse OS (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02–3.14; P = 0.007) and GRFS (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.26–4.35; P = 0.007) were associated with reduced BMI (d-BMI < − 2). Treatment-related weight reduction in AML was associated with poor outcome after HSCT.

To access the full text, please Sign in

If you have institutional access, please click here

Share the Knowledge